Feature Friday Film: The Cat Writers’ Association Contest and Conference

Debbie is a professional member of the Cat Writers’ Association. Every year, CWA holds an annual contest and conference. This year, because of the pandemic, the Awards Ceremony of this conference will be virtual. This event consists of the awarding of prizes by sponsors and Muse Medallions, the most prestigious award given by the CWA. To be in the running for this award, you must win at least one Certificate of Excellence in a contest category. This year, Debbie has won 3 certificates in the article, blog, and short story categories. I was thrilled that her blog award was for this blog and my story, Sneaky’s Christmas Mystery. You can find a list of other winners and the award categories at https://bit.ly/CWA2019CertificatesofExcellence.

Muse Medallion (photo: courtesy of the Catwriters’ Association)

Here are some videos from last year’s conference that took place in St. Louis, Missouri. They are from the Cat Writers’ Association Facebook page.

Here is President, Deb Barnes, opening up the Awards Banquet.

Here is a video of the presentation of the special awards at the banquet.

Here is the presentation of the Muse Medallions.

If you’re a writer, artist, poet, or any creative who features cats in their work, you should consider joining this pawsome group. Maybe you can win a prize  and meet some talented and cat-loving people at the annual conference when they meet in person next year. For more information, check out the website: http://catwriters.com/

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Hermione’s Kitty Korner #19: My Brothers Have Problems

Hi, it’s Hermione with another column about what’s going on with me and my family. While we are all doing relatively well during the pandemic, my brothers have had a couple of problems. Stripey, my older brother, was diagnosed with a condition called hyperthyroidism and my blood brother, Harry, got a bad bite on his neck.

Here’s what happened to them. My Mom was worried about Stripey because he’d lost some weight, but grandma thought it was because me and Harry were eating all his food. Grandpa didn’t think he was sick because he was acting the same and was actually a little more active and affectionate. But, just in case, grandma thought he should have a check-up. He went to the vet and had blood work. They had to take the blood from his neck because that’s where the thyroid is located, and the vet was testing for thyroid function as well as other things. Loss of weight is a sign of several problems in cats.

Debbie checked with the vet a few days later, and she was told that Stripey had hyperthyroidism which means his thyroid is fast and that’s why he’s losing weight. She was given several options for treating him. The vet suggested pills, but there was also an ear gel that could be administered through a pen-shaped applicator that Debbie thought Stripey would find easier. A pharmacy had to send it to her. When she got it, there was a toy mouse enclosed in the package.

Our grandmother, Debbie’s daughter, who once wanted to be a vet, followed the instructions and administered the ear gel to Stripey. He took it like a camper, and will be getting two doses a day, one in each ear. In three weeks, he will go back to the vet for more bloodwork to check how the medicine is working.

But Stripey wasn’t my only brother who had a problem lately. Shortly after Stripey returned from the vet’s office,  he had a big playfight with Harry. Both brothers tend to be biters, and Stripey, not feeling so well, got his teeth into Harry’s neck when Harry bothered him. Mom discovered the bite, and Grandma called the vet. They were told to clean out the wound and then use a triple antibiotic on it twice a day for a week. If it swelled up, began to smell, or got worse, he would have to be taken in for an antibiotic shot. So far, Harry is doing well, and the bite is healing, but there’s still a lot of fur missing on his neck.

I hope the two boys will stop being so rough with one another.

Cats don’t like to show when they’re sick, so be aware of subtle signs such as loss of appetite, too much appetite, vomiting, change of behavior, listlessness, and any other differences in your kitty. You should also check your cat’s fur and body every day for any bumps, cuts, and bites. Stripey and Harry were lucky that our hoomans caught their problems early.

Until next time, Purrs, Hermione.

Feature Friday Film: Hyperthyroidism in Cats

My author’s 12-year-old cat, Stripey, was recently diagnosed with hyperthyroidisim. She found some videos we’re sharing today that explain this condition and how to treat it.

Do you have a cat with hyperthyroidism, or do you think your cat might have it? Remember to always check with your vet first about any symptoms you notice and follow the doctor’s recommendations.

Debbie will be using a pen applicator to administer a transdermal gel into Stripey’s ears which is another option for medicating a pet with hyperthyroidism. This video demonstrates how to administer the medicine, but check with your vet or pharmacist for directions if you choose this method of treatment.

Feature Friday Film: Leash Walking Your Cat

Meow and Happy Friday from Sneaky the Library Cat from the Cobble Cove mysteries. I hope you’re all doing well. My author is still at home working on her writing and other projects. The weather here has been very spring-like, and she’s taken advantage of the pleasant temperatures to do some walking and  has noticed many dog walkers in the neighborhood. Although she has three cats, she doesn’t walk with any of them. A long time ago, she leash-trained her cat, Floppy, but it didn’t quite work out. He ended up stuck in a tree after getting off the leash. But for those who start early and persevere, leash walking with your cat can be a fun adventure. Check out these Feature Friday films to see how to leash train a cat and whether you should consider it for your own kitty. Have a nice and safe weekend.